Ginger

The ginger we are familiar with — the type you sprinkle over food, grate into salad dressing, or sip as a tea — is the rhizome (edible, underground portion) of the ginger plant. If you’ve ever seen fresh turmeric and ginger next to one another, it won’t surprise you that the two are closely related. Aside from adding warm, spicy flavor, ginger also delivers medicinal properties. One of the most well-known is its reputation as a treatment for nausea and vomiting caused by morning sickness during pregnancy. In addition to making a pregnant woman’s daily routine much more difficult, nausea and vomiting can also lead to dehydration and weight loss.

Results

Some sources estimate that up to 90% of pregnant women will experience nausea and vomiting. There are studies on human subjects that indicate that ginger may very well quell pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting, reducing not only the number of nausea/vomiting episodes but also reducing the severity and length of time. One study that is often sited gave women either 4 doses of a placebo or 4 doses of 250mg of ginger powder each day and the women who got the ginger powder reported significantly fewer symptoms. Which brings up the question of dosing — how much ginger is safe and effective to relieve nausea and vomiting symptoms in pregnant women? One thousand milligrams each day seems to be the number that turns up in both previous and current research. This is an amount that is deemed safe, with little potential for side effects, and why Boost It Up! Mango Ginger contains 250mg of ginger per serving.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2990891/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2907767/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21297474

 

 

Enteric Coating

Question:
Are enterically coated supplements better than non-enterically coated ones?

Answer:
Enteric coatings help protect supplement ingredients from being released in the stomach and keep them away from stomach acid and enzymes. This allows the supplement to stay intact until it reaches the less acidic small intestine (where most nutrient absorption takes place).  An enteric coating may also be desirable for ingredients which, for some people, otherwise cause an unpleasant aftertaste. Consequently, with ingredients that need protection it is sometimes worthwhile to purchase an enterically coated supplement. Be Well Rounded! is